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Home Blog Blog 62 Cutlass Spindle conversion

62 Cutlass Spindle conversion

Home Page Forums Discussion Topics – Ask the Experts 62 Cutlass Spindle conversion

This topic contains 29 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  captiannapalm 2 months, 4 weeks ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 30 total)
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  • #12933

    joe_padavano
    Participant
    I used a 1980 Ford Fairmont MC at 7/8″ bore, fits nice but I am not happy with the “long” pedal.

    You can trade M/C bore and/or pedal ratio for stroke, at the expense of pedal force. The M/C for a mid-70s AMC Hornet has RH ports and is about the same overall size as the Fairmont M/C. These are available in both 1″ and 1 1/16″ bore. This will reduce travel, but increase required pedal force.

    #12934

    62cutlassconvert
    Participant

    Yes,thanks Joe, saw those in the Scarebird/Skylark Forum discussion. Gotta go back on there and ask how they worked out. I looked up application on Dorman and although most of the applications are drum/drum there is a manual disc/drum app for a 1976 CJ7. Talked to Dorman tech but they couldn’t add anything to it other than it does not have a residual valve, which is kinda funny since it has a drum drum and disc/drum application. Could always put one in line for the rear brakes I guess.

    #12941

    joe_padavano
    Participant

    The reality is that you can use a drum brake MC for front discs so long as 1) it has the correct bore for the application, 2) you remove the residual pressure valve that is in the outlet port to the front brakes, and 3) you understand that the smaller reservoir for the front brakes will require more frequent checking of the fluid level.

    There is nothing magic about a master cylinder for disc brakes. The calipers neither know nor care what it looks like. All they care about is the piston bore and stroke.

    #12944

    captiannapalm
    Participant

    That does not make sense that the front reservoir is smaller seeing as the front bakes account for the majority of the stopping power.

    #12991

    captiannapalm
    Participant

    sharp looking car….notice the headliner is white….what color is the rest of your interior.? just looking to get ideas.

    #12992

    captiannapalm
    Participant
    The reality is that you can use a drum brake MC for front discs so long as 1) it has the correct bore for the application, 2) you remove the residual pressure valve that is in the outlet port to the front brakes, and 3) you understand that the smaller reservoir for the front brakes will require more frequent checking of the fluid level.

    There is nothing magic about a master cylinder for disc brakes. The calipers neither know nor care what it looks like. All they care about is the piston bore and stroke.

    Now why is a dual m/c needed? I know ford has a single m/c for power disc/drum. just asking if GM had one.

    #13012

    joe_padavano
    Participant
    Now why is a dual m/c needed? I know ford has a single m/c for power disc/drum. just asking if GM had one.

    In fact, there have been cars built with a single circuit M/C and disk/drum brakes. Personally, I prefer a dual system just for the added safety, but there is nothing that mandates it for disks. GM did not offer disk brakes until the 1967 model year, and the Feds required the dual circuit brake system at that same time, so no GM cars came with the single circuit M/C and disk brakes.

    #13015

    62cutlassconvert
    Participant

    Don’t ask me why but the Disk/Drum MC pictures you see earlier in this thread use the larger reservoir at the rear for the front disc brakes. The reason the disc reservoir is larger is that as disc brake calipers work, the pistons move out and stay out creating a larger and larger cavity in the caliper cylinder resulting in a “permanent” use of the fluid. The larger reservoir holds more fluid so frequent checking for fluid levels in not necessary as the pads wear and the pistons move out. Drum brakes return most of the fluid to the reservoir when the pedal is released since the shoes mechanically adjust out toward the drums and the springs pull the shoes back in resulting in the slave wheel cylinder pistons returning to their at rest position. As has been stated you would just need to check a non-disk/drum MC more often and remove the residual valve if fitted for the disk application. In our case where space is at a premium it’s one of the options.

    #13016

    joe_padavano
    Participant

    The orientation of which end of the dual M/C feeds which end of the car depends on the source of the M/C. GM typically (but not always) fed the front brakes from the front of the dual M/C. so GM disk/drum M/Cs tend to have the larger reservoir in the front. Ford and Chrysler typically fed the front brakes from the back of the M/C, so the Fairmont M/C has the larger reservoir in the back. So long as the system is plumbed correctly, the brakes don’t care which of these M/C configurations is used. Interestingly, the M/C used on the Vega/Monza cars are disk/drum but have the same size reservoirs.

    #13021

    captiannapalm
    Participant

    has anyone used the abs power brake conv. kits?

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