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  • #14277

    JimNoel
    Participant

    Hi Eric,
    Have a good trip! You should have fun again this year with another Jetfire barn find! It all helps bring our little gems further out of the orphanage! Thanks for all the updates…….

    #14237

    JimNoel
    Participant

    Is the style you put on your Jetfire (automatic or 4-speed car?), that you pulled from the 61 Buick, the 3147 (Jetfire) or all others (F-85) type?

    #14229

    JimNoel
    Participant

    That is certainly possible as the 61 and 62 Oldsmobile Service Manuals do not show pictures of the battery tray. The only picture that I have found is in the 63 Service Manual (attached again with a larger format). The four 62 F85’s that I have owned all had the bottom end retainer style battery tray.

    Attachments:
    #14224

    JimNoel
    Participant

    If you were more specific with what your car is it sure would be easier for others to help you! Assuming it is not a 1957 VW?, the 1962 Oldsmobile F-85 came with two different battery trays, Jetfire and all others. If the battery tray is corroded out often times one or both of the support brackets are too. If the tray is for a NON- Jetfire application, the end clamp/retainer could be shot too. Just what do you need?

    Attachments:
    #14193

    JimNoel
    Participant

    Hi Eric,
    Why does Hot Rod mag continue to give Corvair Spyder first to market billing? Jetfire was 1st to market with actual cars for sale!
    In 1962, Chevrolet introduced the Corvairs with few changes at the beginning of the year. The bottom line 500 series station wagon was dropped and the 700 became the base station wagon. The “Lakewood” name was dropped. The ever-popular Monza line then took on a wagon model to round out the top of the line. In spring of 1962, Chevrolet committed itself to the sporty image they had created for the Corvair by introducing a convertible version, then offering a high-performance 150 hp (112 kW; 152 PS) turbocharged “Spyder”[18] option for Monza coupes and convertibles, making the Corvair the second production automobile supplied with a turbocharger as a factory option, with the Oldsmobile F-85 Turbo Jetfire having been released earlier in 1962.[19] Corvair station wagons were discontinued at that point in favor the new Corvair Convertible and Chevy II (built at the same assembly plant). The slow-selling Loadside pickup was discontinued at the end of the model year. The rest of the Corvair 95 line of Forward Control vehicles continued. Optional equipment on all passenger cars (except wagons) included metallic brake linings and a heavy-duty suspension consisting of a front anti-roll bar, rear-axle limit straps, revised spring rates, and recalibrated shock absorbers. These provided a major handling improvement by reducing the potentially violent camber change of the rear wheels when making sharp turns at high speeds. The Turbocharged Spyder equipment group featured a multigauge instrument cluster which included a tachometer, cylinder head temperature, and intake manifold pressure gauges, Spyder fender script, and Turbo logo deck emblems, in addition to the high-performance engine.

    (19)Hartman, Jeff (2007). Turbocharging Performance Handbook. MBI Publishing. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-7603-2805-7. Retrieved 16 August 2014.

    #14158

    JimNoel
    Participant

    I had the same problem with Inline for 62 conv’t brake lines. Line from front to back was wrong back in 2007. They said the line is the same for a Cutlass 2 dr post as the Cutlass conv’t. Wrong! I had to send my old line and they copied it, all rest was good. Only extra charge was my shipping of my line to them to copy. They “should” of had the correct pattern after 2007.

    #14131

    JimNoel
    Participant

    This is not expected as all the other cowl tags have a definite pattern and the BK make location places this car out of sequence. Maybe the tag maker was out of sorts that day? lol

    #14123

    JimNoel
    Participant

    Hi Eric,
    I can’t make out the make factory code? “B”+ something? If it is BC it would probably be correct. If it is BK then yes, out of sequence? Recheck the factory make code in the VIN tag. Is it 631Cxxxxx or 631Kxxxxx?
    Jim

    #14104

    JimNoel
    Participant

    My records of some 154 Jetfires shows 4-1962’s and 15-1963’s with 4 speed manual transmissions still original or in some state of restoration. My records are far from complete and the cars I have listed with 4 speeds may NOT be all factory production cars.
    The factory built records show that for 1962 Jetfires, 16 were 3 speed manual, 203 were 4 speed manual and 3,546 were automatics. In 1963 the Jetfire production records show 45 were 3 speed manual, 1,391 were 4 speed manual and 4,406 were automatics.
    The most rare survivor is the 3 speed manual of which I only have heard of ONE that still exists! This is a 1963 Jetfire.

    #14099

    JimNoel
    Participant

    Yes, on my car the clip is to hold the fuel return rubber hose on non power steering cars.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 242 total)